ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY OF
ST MARINA AND ST KENELM, GRIMSBY

ANTIOCHIAN ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN ARCHDIOCESE OF THE BRITISH ISLES AND IRELAND
worshipping at the Grimsby Cemetery South Chapel, Scartho Road, Grimsby DN33 2AJ                    Patriarch: His Beatitude John X     
Archbishop: His Eminence Metropolitan Silouan   Priest: Fr Alban
  

Copyright Orthodox Christian Community of St Marina and St Kenelm, Grimsby

ANSWERS TO SOME QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE

Can anyone come to a service at your church?

Of course: the Orthodox Church is the true home of the whole human race so by coming to a service you will be coming 'home'.

Can I take Communion?

Those who are members of the Orthodox Church, in communion with the Patriarchate of Antioch, have the explicit blessing of their Spiritual Father, and have fasted from all food and drink for at least six hours may receive communion. If you are not sure, ask the priest before the service. Come to one of the side doors of the sanctuary to do this, or in emergency; ask the priest quietly when coming forward at the communion itself.

Do you welcome children?

Yes, children are very welcome and it is important for them to feel that this is a place where they should be. If you feel at any time that your child is distracting others from worship, take them out for a little while and then return. Encourage them to reverence the icons, light candles and join in the responses 'Lord have mercy', 'To Thee O Lord', 'Amen', and, if old enough, the Lord's Prayer.

Do you have fellowship after the service?

Orthodox Christians, as well as understanding Fasting, know how to make the most of Feasting! So it is usual for there to be a sharing of food and fellowship after the Liturgy.

How will I know what to do during the Liturgy?

Orthodox worship is not formal, in the sense that everyone has to do the same thing, or that you are 'breaking the rules' if you don't do exactly the same as everyone else. Nor is Orthodox worship a spectator activity, where the priest performs and the people watch. The worship uses all our human senses, because the human body is created holy, and in the image of God. What we see, hear, feel, smell, and taste; should all be part of the Liturgy. It's not just the words and the singing. We should feel free to do as we are moved by the Holy Spirit, but without doing anything to disrupt the flow of the Liturgy, or distract the worship of others. Be free to follow the choir's lead and sing; or to remain silent. Make the sign of the cross when you are inspired to do so. Although we usually stand throughout the service, please sit down if you are tired. We do not kneel or prostrate on Sundays, as they always celebrate Christ's resurrection, but it is usual to bow in acceptance of God's blessing through the priest.

How long does the service of Divine Liturgy last?

About one and half hours.

What do I do if I want to become Orthodox?

First of all, come as often as you can to the Divine Liturgy. As you become familiar with it, you will find out what you need to have more understanding of. Talk  to the Priest who may recommend books that you might find helpful. In due course, you will become a Catechumen, and go through a period of further instruction and preparation. Reception into the Orthodox Church is through the sacraments of Baptism (unless you are already Baptised in way recognised by the Church) and Chrismation.


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